MEMS Heating + Biasing

High Temperature, 9-Contact Biasing, Most Accurate Double Tilt, High T EDS

Technical Specs

Single-Tilt Double-Tilt
Tilt Range Up to ± 45° depending on objective pole Up to ± 20° (alpha and beta) depending on objective pole
Beta-tilt accuracy NA <0.01 degree
Electrical Contacts 9* 9*
Contact Type Direct Chip Contact Direct Chip Contact
Max Operating Temperature > 1000°C > 1000°C
Settled Resolution at 1000°C Up to TEM resolution Up to TEM resolution
Temperature Stability + 100 hours + 100 hours
Temperature Measurement 4-point resistance sensing 4-point resistance sensing
EELS / EDS Compatible Yes (full temp range) Yes (full temp range)
TEM Compatibility TFS/FEI, JEOL, Hitachi TFS/FEI, JEOL, Hitachi

* Contact us for Custom Configurations

Features

Featured Research

Segregation of 2D MoS2 Layers into quantum dots during in-situ high temperature heating

Few-layer 2D MoS2 samples were transferred onto the open viewing area of the MEMS heating chip (Figure (a) ) layered with residual organic layers from the transfer process. Heating up the MoS2 sample to 1000°C resulted into a 2D material with well segregated MoSx quantum dot particles embedded in carbon based-composites and areas with pure MoS2 (Figures (b)-(d) ). Particles smaller than 10 nm were observed and many display hexagonal crystal facets. The segregation happens at temperatures >1000 °C. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed the chemical content of each segregated area. The example shows a dark-field STEM image at a temperature of 1000 °C, together with the EDS map proving the elemental segregation.

Data provided by Jay Horwath, Deep Jariwala and Eric Stach from the University of Pennsylvania.

Figure (a) BFTEM image of as-transferred 2D MoS2 flake on heater chip; (b) DFSTEM Sample heated to 1000°C showing segregation after melting events; (c) DFSTEM image showing MoSx quantum dots (light particles) embedded in carbon-rich region (dark matrix) and un transformed MoS2 (grey regions); (d) elemental EDS maps

Edit

Video Spotlight

In-situ TEM atomic scale diffusion between two quantum dots at high temperatures

The movie on the left shows atomic scale diffusion of atoms between two quantum dots heated to 850°C in-situ in the TEM using Hummingbird Scientific’s MEMS heating + biasing TEM sample holder. Atomic diffusion appears to occur mostly through the bridge between the two particles and continues until the two particles coalesce to form one larger particle.

Data provided by Pawan Kumar, Deep Jariwala and Eric Stach from the University of Pennsylvania.

Edit
Featured Video Play Icon

Customization & Service

Selected Publications

Khim Karki, Victoriea L. Bird, Daan Hein Alsem, and Melissa K. Santala. “In Situ TEM Observation of Crystallization in Phase-Change Material,” Microscopy & Microanalysis  (2018) Abstract
Victoriea L. Bird, Al J. Rise, Khim Karki, Daan Hein Alsem, Geoffrey H. Campbell, and Melissa K. Santala. “Mapping Crystallization Kinetics of Phase-Change Materials Over Large Temperature Ranges Using Complementary In Situ Microscopy Techniques,” Microscopy & Microanalysis  (2018) Abstract
Daan Hein Alsem, James Horwath, Julio Rodriguez-Manzo, Khim Karki and Eric Stach. “Optimized High-Temperature In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Double-Tilt Sample Heating Platform,” Microscopy & Microanalysis (2019)
Daan Hein Alsem, James Horwath, Julio Rodriguez-Manzo, Khim Karki and Eric Stach. “In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Double-Tilt Sample Heating Platform.” Microscience Microscopy Congress (2019)
Khim Karki, Victoriea L. Bird, Julio Rodriguez-Manzo, Daan Hein Alsem, Norman Salmon, and Melissa K. Santala. “Direct Observation of Crystallization in Phase-Change Material Using In-Situ TEM,” International Microscopy Congress (2019)
Victoriea L. Bird, Al J. Rise, Khim Karki, Daan Hein Alsem, Geoffrey H. Campbell, and Melissa K. Santala. “Measuring Crystal Growth Rates in an Amorphous Ag-In-Sb-Te Phase-Change Material Over Large Temperature Ranges Using In-Situ Microscopy Techniques,” Materials Science and Technology (2018)
Xuezhe Zhou, Julio Alejandro Rodriguez Manzo, Matthew Lim, Norman Salmon, and Peter Pauzauskie. “Tracking Thermal Phase Transformations of Luminescence Materials with In-Situ TEM” Materials Research Society (2017)

 

Read More